John Krenzke

John Krenzke

Email: jkrenzke@luc.edu

Office: Crown Center 334C

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Robert Bucholz

File Attachments:
  1. CV CV
  2. Writing Sample Writing Sample
    "The Wages of Sin: Resistance to the Beer Excise in London, 1660-1720" as presented at the Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies (March 2013)

Education

Loyola University- Chicago                                                    Chicago, IL

History, Ph.D. Program

Adviser: Dr. Robert Bucholz

Dissertation Title: “Change is Brewing: The Industrialization of the Beer-Brewing Industry, 1500-1750”

Major Field: Early Modern Europe specializing in sixteenth-, seventeenth-, and eighteenth-century British history

Minor Field: Modern Europe

August 2007-Present                                        

GPA: 3.978

 

The University of Chicago                                                     Chicago, IL

Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences

Master of Arts, June 2004

Author of “Mending One’s Own Roof in a Thunderstorm”: The Recoinage Crisis of 1696-1699.

Adviser: Dr. Steven Pincus

GPA: 3.6

 

The University of Minnesota                                                 Minneapolis, MN

Curtis L. Carlson School of Business

Bachelor of Science in Business, May 2003

Major: Marketing  Second Major: History

History GPA: 3.79     Cumulative GPA: 3.47

Research Interests

My primary current research interest is in the growth and adaptation of the beer-brewing trade in London in the fifteenth to eighteenth centuries. My current project examines the transformation of the beer-brewing trade from a household industry in the fifteenth century that was dominated by women to an industry with large and rapidly industrializing breweries dominated by a professional cadre of male brewers by the eighteenth century. Over the course of this examination I intend to answer how the introduction of hops and coal on the industry allowed brewers to grow breweries to an industrial scale, how and why one oppressed group- foreign males from Germany and the Low Countries- were able to overcome many of the same legal obstacles that were to plague another oppressed group- native females- to transform the beer-brewing industry in fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and finally how and in what ways the introduction of the exicse tax in 1643 was to create the conflicts between brewers and excisemen that paved the way for a new beer style, porter, that would allow for the complete industrialization of the industry in the eighteenth century.

Awards and Fellowships

Arthur J. Schmitt Dissertation Fellowship for the 2013-2014 academic year

Awarded by the Schmitt Foundation and intended to support Ph.D. students who are in the final stage of doctoral work

Loyola Pre-Doctoral Teaching Scholars Fellowship for the 2012-2013 academic year

Awarded by the Loyola University Graduate School to six scholars in the Liberal Arts

The Teaching Scholars act as mentors to new instructors of record in the Liberal Arts during the 2012-2013 academic year

Loyola Advanced Doctoral Fellowship for the 2011-2012 academic year

Awarded by the Loyola University Graduate School as support while fellows pursue full-time dissertation work

Conference Papers

Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies                                                             Berkeley, CA

“The Wages of Sin: Resistance to the Beer Excise in London, 1660-1720”

March 2013

 

Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies                                                             Seattle, WA

“The Politics of Strange Bedfellows: Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough's Influence on Whig Politics, 1714-1744”

March 2011

 

Midwest Conference on British Studies                                                                    Cleveland, OH

“Political Capital: The Investment Strategies of Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough” 

October 2010

 

Loyola History Graduate Student Association Conference                                         Chicago, IL

“Political Capital: The Investment Strategies of Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough” 

April 2010

 

Loyola Women and Leadership Archives Lunch Lecture Series                                  Chicago, IL

“Political Capital: The Investment Strategies of Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough” 

February 2010

 

Midwest Conference on British Studies                                                                      Pittsburgh, PA

The Power of the Purse: Goldsmiths during the Reigns of the later Stuarts and George III”

October 2009

Work Experience

Adjunct History Instructor                                                                                      January 2011-Present

Loyola University Chicago, Department of History                                                          Chicago, IL

  • Instructor for History 104/204- Global History since 1500
  • Instructor for History 102- Evolution of Western Ideas and Institutions since 1600
  • Instructor for History 111- U.S. History to 1865

 

Adjunct History Instructor                                                                                      Sept. 2005-Aug. 2012

The College of DuPage, Department of History                                                              Glen Ellyn, IL

  • Instructor for History 1110- Western Civilization to 1600
  • Instructor for History 1120- Western Civilization from 1600

 

Adjunct History Instructor                                                                                       Jan. 2005-March 2006

The Cooking and Hospitality Institute of Chicago                                                            Chicago, IL

  • Instructor for History of Western Civilization to 1715
Author: John Krenzke
Last modified: 3/26/2013 10:24 AM (EDT)